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Brain Awareness Week 2022

Details

At this webinar, learn about the challenges physicians face in treating Alzheimer’s disease, what happens to the brain in patients with this disease, and research on cell types in healthy and diseased human brains. This webinar is geared towards members of the general public who are interested in learning more about Alzheimer’s disease, cell types in neuroscience, and current research in both areas.

Mar 9, 2022

Virtual

Time

4:00PM-5:00PM PST

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About This Event

Alzheimer’s disease is a common form of dementia that leads to devastating cognitive and neurological deficits. However, despite affecting an estimated 6.2 million adults in the US alone in 2021, its causes are poorly understood and no effective treatments exist to halt or reverse the neuron death caused by the disease. How the disease starts — and what happens in single cells across the brain as the disease progresses — is similarly unknown. Research at the Allen Institute for Brain Science and elsewhere on the types of cells that make up the human brain has applications for understanding what is happening in Alzheimer’s.

At this webinar, learn about the challenges physicians face in treating Alzheimer’s disease, what happens to the brain in patients with this disease, and current research on cell types in healthy and diseased human brains.

This free webinar is geared towards members of the general public who are interested in learning more about Alzheimer’s disease, cell types in neuroscience, and current research in both areas. The presenters will not assume any prior knowledge of the neuroscience of Alzheimer’s or cell types. This event is also suitable for students at the high school level and above.

This webinar is presented by members of the Alzheimer’s center at the Allen Institute for Brain Science, an NIH-supported collaboration between the Allen Institute for Brain Science, University of Washington Medicine, and Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Group. Its goal is to apply the methods and understanding of cell types developed in part at the Allen Institute for Brain Science to Alzheimer’s disease, particularly in the early stages of the disease and to identifying potential therapy targets.

Brain Awareness Week, sponsored by the Dana Foundation, is a worldwide campaign to develop public awareness, knowledge, and enthusiasm about the brain and neuroscience. Learn more at brainawareness.org.

Event overview

  • Introduction: Ed Lein, Ph.D.

  • Clinical challenges of Alzheimer’s disease: Kimiko Domoto-Reilly, M.D.

  • Neuropathology of Alzheimer’s disease: Caitlin Latimer, M.D., Ph.D.

  • Introduction to cell types in neuroscience: Rebecca Hodge, Ph.D.

  • Cell types in Alzheimer’s disease: Kyle Travaglini, Ph.D.

  • Q&A: all speakers

 

Audience members will be invited to submit questions for the speakers at any point in the program.

Speakers

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Kimiko Domoto-Reilly, M.D.

Kimiko Domoto-Reilly, M.D., is a neurologist in the UW Memory and Brain Wellness Center, where she diagnoses and treats people with neurodegenerative dementias. She has expertise in atypical dementias, including frontotemporal degeneration spectrum disorders. She completed behavioral neurology fellowship training at Mass General Brigham in Boston, senior neuropsychiatry fellowship at MGH, and obtained a Master’s degree with a research focus on structural MR imaging in frontotemporal dementia. In collaboration with UW Alzheimer's Disease Research Center researchers, she studies autosomal dominantly-inherited neurodegenerative diseases, in order to better understand the factors influencing variation in age of onset, genetic penetrance, and disease progression.

Caitlin Latimer, M.D., Ph.D.

Caitlin Latimer is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Neuropathology and the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology at the University of Washington and co-leader of the Neuropathology core for the UW Alzheimer's Disease Research Center. She completed her M.D. and Ph.D. at the University of Kentucky prior to her residency in Anatomic Pathology and fellowship in Neuropathology at the University of Washington. Her research interests as a physician-scientist include investigating the underlying mechanisms of age-related neurodegenerative disease processes, particularly how multiple pathologic proteins may synergize to promote cognitive dysfunction with age.

Kyle Travaglini, Ph.D.

Kyle Travaglini is a Scientist I at the Allen Institute for Brain Science. As a member of the Human Cell Types program, Kyle is focused on its project to characterize the molecular and cellular changes that underpin Alzheimer’s disease. Previously, he completed a Ph.D. in Biochemistry at Stanford University, where he constructed a single cell transcriptomic atlas of the human lung under the mentorship of Dr. Mark Krasnow. Prior to that, he conducted research with Dr. Steven Clark at the University of California, Los Angeles, where he received a B.S. in Biochemistry and identified a mechanism in yeast that helps ensure their proteins are built correctly.

Kaitlyn Casimo, Ph.D.

Kaitlyn Casimo leads training programs and materials for scientists to learn how to use the open data resources and tools produced by the Allen Institute for Brain Science (brain-map.org) and Allen Institute for Cell Science (allencell.org). She also leads the programming and resources for high school and college educators, available at alleninstitute.org/learn. She received her BA in neuroscience from Pomona College and Ph.D. in neuroscience from the University of Washington, where she also received certificates in neural computation & engineering and science, technology, & society studies.