Team

Staff Profiles

Brian Lee, Ph.D.

Scientist II

brianle@alleninstitute.org

Brian Lee joined the Allen Institute in 2014 as a scientist in the Mouse Cell Types research program. Before joining the Allen Institute he was a postdoctoral research associate in the lab of Paul Kenny at the Scripps Research Institute in Jupiter, FL. In Dr. Kenny’s lab he established electrophysiology and examined synaptic transmission and it’s role in nicotine reinforcement and aversion. Brian obtained his Ph.D. in neuroscience from Washington State University in 2011 under the guidance of Yan Dong, where he used electrophysiology, in vitro and in vivo optogenetics to examine the generation and maturation of neural circuits during cocaine exposure and withdrawal.

Research

Research Interests

My research interests are to obtain a comprehensive profile of cell types within the visual cortex. Utilizing my experience in electrophysiology and in vitro optogenetics, I will use transgenic mice to methodically characterize the synaptic connections into the visual cortex, extract the cellular contents of single cells and obtain a full transcriptional profile with the hopes of further classifying specific cell types. With this information we can gain a more comprehensive understanding of the molecular underpinnings of the physiological diversity of different cell types, ultimately, building the framework of how visual information is coded within the brain.

Expertise

  • Electrophysiology
  • Synaptic physiology
  • Neural plasticity
  • Behavior

Research Programs

  • Mouse Cell Types
  • Research and Development

Selected Publications View on PUBMED

Classification of electrophysiological and morphological neuron types in mouse visual cortex

Nature Neuroscience
June 17, 2019

Gouwens NW, Sorensen SA, Berg J, Lee C, Jarsky T, Ting J, Sunkin S, Feng D, Anastassiou C, Barkan E, Bickley K, Blesie N, Braun T, Brouner K, Budzillo A, Caldejon S, Casper T, Castelli D, Chong P, Crichton K, Cuhaciyan C, Daigle T, Dalley R, Dee N, Desta T, Dingman S, Doperalski A, Dotson N, Egdorf T, Fisher M, de Frates RA, Garren E, Garwood M, Gary A, Gaudreault N, Godfrey K, Gorham M, Gu H, Habel C, Hadley K, Harrington J, Harris J, Henry A, Hill D, Josephsen S, Kebede S, Kim L, Kroll M, Lee B, Lemon T, Liu X, Long B, Mann R, McGraw M, Mihalas S, Mukora A, Murphy GJ, Ng L, Ngo K, Nguyen TN, Nicovich PR, Oldre A, Park D, Parry S, Perkins J, Potekhina L, Reid D, Robertson M, Sandman D, Schroedter M, Slaughterbeck C, Soler-Llavina C, Sulc J, Szafer A, Tasic B, Taskin N, Teeter C, Thatra N, Tung H, Wakeman W, Williams G, Young R, Zhou Z, Farrell C, Peng H, Hawrylycz MJ, Lein E, Ng L, Arkhipov A, Bernard A, Phillips J, Zeng H, Koch C

In vivo sub-millisecond two-photon optogenetics with temporally focused patterned light

Journal of Neuroscience
March 4, 2019

Chen IW, Ronzitti E, Lee BR, Daigle T, Dalkara D, Zeng H, Emiliani V, Papagiakoumou E

Exposure to cocaine regulates inhibitory synaptic transmission in the nucleus accumbens

Journal of Neuroscience
April 17, 2013

Otaka M, Ishikawa M, Lee BR, Liu L, Neumann PA, Cui R, Huang YH, Schlüter OM, Dong Y

Selective presynaptic enhancement of the prefrontal cortex to nucleus accumbens pathway by cocaine

PNAS
January 8, 2013

Suska A, Lee BR, Huang YH, Dong Y, Schlüter OM

Maturation of silent synapses in amygdala-accumbens projection contributes to incubation of cocaine craving

Nature Neuroscience
November 2013

Lee BR, Ma YY, Huang YH, Wang X, Otaka M, Ishikawa M, Neumann PA, Graziane NM, Brown TE, Suska A, Guo C, Lobo MK, Sesack SR, Wolf ME, Nestler EJ, Shaham Y, Schlüter OM, Dong Y

Searching for presynaptic NMDA receptors in the nucleus accumbens

Journal of Neuroscience
December 14, 2011

Huang YH, Ishikawa M, Lee BR, Nakanishi N, Schlüter OM, Dong Y

In vivo cocaine experience generates silent synapses

Neuron
July 16, 2009

Huang YH, Lin Y, Mu P, Lee BR, Brown TE, Wayman G, Marie H, Liu W, Yan Z, Sorg BA, Schlüter OM, Zukin RS, Dong Y