Accelerating discoveries and pushing the frontiers of bioscience

The Allen Institute is fiercely committed to solving some of the biggest mysteries of bioscience, researching the unknown of human biology, in the brain, the human cell and the immune system. At the same time, we are pushing the frontiers of bioscience to continue to explore the edges of scientific discovery. 

Our scientists within each division collaborate in a team science approach, tackling big science projects. And everything learned within our walls is shared publicly across the world in what we call open science

All this work is done to fulfill our founder Paul G. Allen’s vision for accelerating global progress towards improving health and lengthening life.

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15 Years of Impact at the Allen Institute

Learn more about our approach to collaborative, open science.


Latest News

Read more about the Allen Institute in the news and stories highlighting accomplishments and partnerships. 

News

Gene drives get a precision upgrade

April 16, 2019

Method to fine tune DNA could be used to engineer malaria-resistant mosquitoes, reduce pesticide use, boost growth of certain crops

News

A new technique to make beating human heart cells glow

April 10, 2019

Fluorescent labels on the cellular structures that allow our hearts to beat will enable studies of cardiac defects or regeneration

News

How immune cells detect different threat levels from salmonella

March 20, 2019

Detailed findings of how immune cells detect subtle changes in infection could point to targets for better antibiotics

News

5 unsolved mysteries about the brain

March 14, 2019

Can we understand our own brains? We have a long way to go, neuroscientists say.

News

Scientists are creating virtual simulations of the brain to better understand the real thing

March 11, 2019

The Allen Institute for Brain Science’s experiments generate massive amounts of data. How to make sense of it all? Computational models can help.

News

An ancient pathway that relays visual information in the mammalian brain

March 7, 2019

Researchers found that a mysterious part of the brain known as the pulvinar responds to small moving objects, possibly allowing instinctive reactions like capturing prey

Our Impact on Science, and our World

Our knowledge, data and tools have been a catalyst across the world, allowing other scientists to accelerate their research and advance our understanding of human health and disease.

View More Impact Stories

 

See how Stanford electrical engineering student Amy Christensen used data from the Allen Brain Observatory to study how visual information is coded by the brain.
See how Christopher Chen from Boston University's Tissue Microfabrication Laboratory used the Allen Institute's publicly available human cell lines to study the structure that gives our heart muscle the ability to contract and pump blood.


Our Revolutionary Scientific Resources

Atlases that map the brain, a “periodic table” of cell types in the brain, and an observatory allowing for a large-scale approach to understanding the brain and watching neurons fire in real time, are all available on Allen Brain Map.
We created the first predictive and integrated 3D cell explorer and a collection of human stem cells to help improve the collective understanding of human cells in health—and ultimately disease, all available on the Allen Cell Explorer.

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